A Day Trip to Rimini

The town of Rimini is an ancient one, founded as Ariminum by the Romans in 268BC. Its combination of Roman ruins, seascape and good seafood make it an interesting choice for a day trip from Bologna.

Roman Rimini

Rimini is at one end of the Via Emilia which passes through the centre of Bologna and finishes in Piacenza, or Placentia in Latin. This road was completed in 187BC and follows more or less a straight line for 260km. One of the most impressive sites in Rimini is the original Roman bridge, completed in the reign of the Emperor Tiberius. This 2,000 year old structure still carries daily road traffic.

Roman bridge Rimini
The Roman bridge at the start of the Via Emilia in Rimini, completed in 21AD is still in use.

Nearby is the set of ruins known as the “Surgeon’s House”. The name comes from a comprehensive set of over 150 surgical instruments which were found in the course of excavations of one of the houses on the site in the years after its discovery in 1998.

surgeons house rimini 2
The “Surgeon’s House” Roman ruins in Rimini.

Some time around the 5th century, the site was used as a Christian cemetery.

surgeons house rimini graves 2
In the 5th century, Christian graves were dug in the ruins, cutting right through mosaic floors hidden below the earth.

Nearby is the Museo della Città or City Museum where some of the finds, including the surgical instruments and mosaics, are held.

Rimini ancient roman surgical instruments
Some of the ancient surgical instruments found in the archaeological site, held in the City Museum.

At the end of the Corso d’Augusto in the centre of town you’ll find one of the oldest surviving Roman Arches, completed in 27BC. It stood at the end of the Via Flaminia that led to Rome. It was encased in the medieval wall, demolished in the fascist period.

Arco_d´Augusto_Rimini
The Arch of Augustus, Rimini. (Wikimedia)

The beach

Rimini is well known as a seaside resort and is very crowded in the peak holiday season of August. In the photo below you can see the very organized nature of Italian beaches where you have to pay for a space with umbrella and chairs.

Beach_of_Rimini_(14-07-2012) wikimedia
The beach at Rimini, (Wikimedia)

Off season, the beach is almost deserted.

rimini seaside off season
Rimini Beach off season.

The very famous Grand Hotel was built in 1908. It has suffered from a fire as well as damage during World War Two, but is still functioning today. It featured prominently in the film “Amacord” by Frederico Fellini.

rimini grand hotel
The Grand Hotel, Rimini.

Rimini is the home town of Fellini and after he became successful, he often stayed at the Grand Hotel in a suite that is popular with visitors. The city  holds exhibitions related to him and his time and a Fellini Museum is planned.

Dining

For lunch, you’ll find any number of good seafood restaurants. One where we’ve eaten more than once is “Il Pescato dal Canevone”

Getting there

Rimini can be reached by train from Bologna in 53 minutes at a cost of around €13 each way. There are frequent trains on this route.

5 thoughts on “A Day Trip to Rimini

      1. First, sorry for my english, i’m italian.

        Great post and amazing blog.
        Did you also see medieval and renaissance Rimini? For example medieval frescoes in Sant’Agostino church, or the Tempio Malatestiano?
        There are also a lot of amazing place pn the Covignano hill, very near to the city.

        Like

      2. Hi Martin, thanks very much for your kind comments. No, I haven’t visited the places you mentioned. Normally I would do more research for a post, but I haven’t been able to go to Italy for over a year now. I’m using photos that I have from trips back over the years to write the occasional post.

        Chi lo sa quando mia moglie ed io possiamo tornare in Italia, abitiamo in Australia. Forse resta impossible anche quest’anno . Quando torno, vado a Rimini un’altra volta per vedere i posti che hai nominato.

        I think your English is better than my Italian !

        Thanks

        Paul

        Like

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